Exploring Biological Specimens with Computed Tomography

September 21, 2017

At the end of July, YXLON International, a company of the Swiss tech holding COMET Group, lent one of their state-of-the-art computed tomography systems to the California Academy of Sciences to experience the benefits of CT in biological research.

At the end of July, YXLON International, a company of the Swiss tech holding COMET Group, lent one of their state-of-the-art computed tomography systems to the California Academy of Sciences.  The FF20 CT system will be in use at the institute until January 31st, 2018.

Computed Tomography (CT) imaging technology allows Cal Academy scientists to see the inner features of specimens using non-destructive evaluation methods.

This compact industrial CT system is on loan to explore how this technology can be used to understand and sustain life on Earth. 

High resolution CT scans will reveal critical clues of how organisms work and how they’re related.  This cooperation will create and provide images for scientific study and public inspiration.

They have already used the FF20 CT to produce stunning images of a variety of biological specimens and explore the natural world around us.

Above are CT images of a Nebria eschscholtzi, a beetle native to California and the American west. They will use images like these to study different aspects of how the insect’s organs function. The internal structure highlighted in red is the kidney.

Shown above are CT images of a juvenile California Sea Lion tooth.  The left offers a cross sectional view while the right highlights the enamel in red and the root in green.

Latest Posts

Advanced CT Imaging of a Marten Skull

October 05, 2023 | Gina Naujokat

With the Comet Yxlon FF35 CT inspection system and advanced Vista features, you just choose the resolution you need - quick and simple. You obtain prime scan results by saving prescious time. See how it works.

View more

Fast porosity analysis of castings with Dragonfly

September 22, 2023 | Gina Naujokat

View three simple (and fast!) methods for evaluating porosity via CT with Dragonfly. Each method can be automated using macros, with a downloadable application note detailing the method and analysis time required.

View more

Looking back millions of years into the earth's history with computed tomography

July 27, 2023 | Gina Naujokat

A sedimentary slab from the Holstein Rock was to be examined for its fossil content using computed tomography. Latest CT technology provided results no one had expected.

View more